Is the House of Virgin Mary Real?

Is the House of Virgin Mary Real?

Is the House of Virgin Mary Real? There are many different sources regarding whether the House of Virgin Mary is real or not, as well as where Virgin Mary spent the final days of her life.

Is the House of Virgin Mary Real?

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Is the House of Virgin Mary Real? There are many different sources regarding whether the House of Virgin Mary is real or not, as well as where Virgin Mary spent the final days of her life. The absence of official records naturally leads to people’s doubts about whether the region is truly the place where Virgin Mary lived. While there is no problem with the existence of a house near the Ephesus region, there are some doubts about the evidence that supports the claim that it is the House of Virgin Mary.

Are There Any Evidence That It’s the House of Virgin Mary? When the church known as the House of Virgin Mary was first discovered in Ephesus, it resembled ruins. Later, through restoration efforts, the general condition of the house was improved and converted into a church. One of the important pieces of evidence that it is the House of Virgin Mary is the fact that the location of this house was seen by a nun who had never been to this region, and had never even left Germany. The fact that this region was discovered entirely based on spiritual feelings cannot be considered a coincidence.

As previously mentioned, the nun Anne Catherine Emmerich had never left Germany and was bedridden. She began to see details about both Jesus and Virgin Mary in her dreams. The dreams of the nun, known for her mystical powers, were naturally taken seriously, and as a result of her descriptions, the Church of Virgin Mary, which nobody knew about, was found. Initially a ruin and even lacking a roof when first discovered, today it hosts both local and foreign tourists.

Acceptance of the House of Virgin Mary by the Roman Catholic Church Initially, the Roman Catholic Church did not accept the House of Virgin Mary due to lack of sufficient evidence. However, in 1896, when Pope XIII. Leo made his first pilgrimage to the region, it can be concluded that the Roman Catholic Church accepted the region as the House of Virgin Mary. By 1951, Pope XII. Pius referred to the house as a sacred site in the definition of the Assumption of Virgin Mary. Later, Pope XXIII. John made this status permanent. Despite the lack of direct evidence for the House of Virgin Mary, the stance of the Roman Catholic Church has proven that the house is indeed where Virgin Mary spent the final days of her life.